Project summary

What we're doing

We’re making safety and accessibility improvements along Gordonton Road in the city’s north. This includes upgrading some of the key intersections along the corridor to make it safer for everyone.

So far, we’ve completed the upgrade of the Gordonton Road and Thomas Road intersection, reduced the speed limit along Gordonton Road from 80km/h to 60km/h and installed an off-road shared path through the Mangaiti gully to create an alternative route for pedestrians and people on bikes.

In 2023, works will begin to upgrade the following intersections to make it safer and more accessible for people using Gordonton Road:

  • Gordonton Road and Darjon Road intersection
  • Gordonton Road, Wairere Drive, Pardoa Boulevard and Crosby Road roundabout
  • Gordonton Road and Puketaha Road intersection.

Why we're doing it

A number of the key intersections along Gordonton Road have been identified for improvement to make it safer for everyone who uses it.

Each of these projects fall under Council’s Vision Zero – intersection improvements programme – which is 49% funded by Hamilton City Council’s Long-Term Plan 21-31, with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s National Land Transport Plan 21-31, providing the additional 51% of funding.  

They also align with Council's Access Hamilton Strategy – Ara Kootuitui Kirikiriroa - aiming to help people connect to places in safe, accessible, and smart ways.  

This project will

  • Make the Gordonton corridor safer for all road users

  • Help to renew a core part of our city's roads

  • Improve visibility for roundabout users

Gordonton Road and Darjon Drive intersection

  • Building a new roundabout to make it easier and safer for vehicles to turn in and out of Darjon Drive
  • Installing raised platforms at each approach to the roundabout on Gordonton Road to slow traffic down
  • Installing a raised safety platform that doubles as a courtesy crossing for pedestrians and people on bikes on Darjon Drive.

Gordonton Road, Wairere Drive, Pardoa Boulevard and Crosby Road roundabout

  • Upgrading the inner guardrail at the roundabout to make it safer for all users.

Gordonton Road and Puketaha Road intersection

  • Building a new roundabout to make it easier and safer for vehicles to turn in and out of Puketaha Road, and creating a new connection into St James Drive
  • Installing raised platforms at each approach to the roundabout on Gordonton Road to slow traffic down
  • Installing a raised safety platform that doubles as a courtesy crossing for pedestrians and people on bikes on St James Drive
  • Enabling Waikato Regional Council to create a new route to improve public transport options.

Frequently asked questions

Why is Council doing these works?

These projects tie in with similar projects in the area – which have resulted in immediate improvements – including the Gordonton and Thomas Road traffic signal and raised safety platform intersection improvements installed in 2019.

From 2017 to 2019, there were 33 recorded crashes at the Thomas Road intersection, including one death. Paired with lowering the speed limit on Gordonton Road to 60km/h, this intersection upgrade has seen significant improvements with only one crash recorded between 2020 and 2022.

About 11,000 vehicles drive through this corridor daily.

Why raised safety platforms?

We have started using raised safety platforms at busy intersections and in areas where there is a lot of walking and biking activity, particularly near schools and key destinations. What the data tells us is a person hit by a car at 50km/h has an 80% chance of being killed. If that car is going 30km/h, their chance of death drops to 10%. Raised safety platforms help to slow traffic down.

Are you installing speed bumps?

The purpose of the raised safety platforms is to encourage drivers to slow down when entering and existing the roundabout. Raised safety platforms reduce speeds to a level where crashes can be avoided, and crash speeds are survivable. This keeps everyone safe, including pedestrians and people on bikes. International research shows raised safety platforms reduce death and serious injuries by about 40%.

Why are the raised safety platforms being installed near the roundabout?

The raised safety platforms are being installed near the roundabout to reduce the speed of vehicles travelling through the intersection. The platforms also line up with the preferred walking and biking routes people take when using the surrounding shared path to navigate the roundabout.

How long will these works take to complete?

Works on Gordonton Road are expected to take place until August 2023 , with each project taking about 10 to 12 weeks to complete, depending on weather, and will take place during the day and at night. To minimise disruption, footpath works will be completed during the day and construction of the raised platforms will be done at night.

Are you doing more to improve the transport network?

This project is part of a wider programme to improve existing intersections and make them safer for all users. Council’s ambition is to have more people walking and biking by providing a safe transport network. Safety upgrades to the Church Road – Te Rapa Road roundabout include constructing a new shared path so people can safely walk and bike to nearby destinations. 

How does this project support Council's Access Hamilton strategy?

Access Hamilton aims to move people safely around the city. We also want more people to be able to travel on foot, by bike or use micro-mobility devices such as scooters. Planned improvements to the Gordonton Road corridor support these aspirations.

This project also supports the shared vision of Council and Waka Kotahi where no one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes. Learn more about the National Road Safety Strategy, Road to Zero.

How is this project funded?

Each of these projects fall under Council’s Vision Zero – intersection improvements programme – which is 49% funded by Hamilton City Council’s Long-Term Plan 21-31, with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s National Land Transport Plan 21-31, providing the additional 51% of funding.

How do these upgrades make the roundabout safer?

These safety upgrades are about making the roundabout safer for everyone. The raised safety platforms are designed to lower vehicles’ speeds to 30km/h when travelling through the roundabout, making the intersection safer for pedestrians and people on bikes. Slowing down vehicles’ speeds also helps create gaps for drivers to enter the roundabout, which keeps traffic moving.

Why are you fixing this roundabout when there are other intersections that need impro

This project is one of a series of upgrades being made to key intersections across Hamilton. These upgrades aim to make our streets safer and more accessible for everyone, no matter how people choose to travel.

As Hamilton grows, we need to change with it. This is why we are improving road safety across our city: to give people of Hamilton greater choices to be able to get where they need to go – safely, efficiently, and on time.

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Last updated 6 March 2023